COLLAGE I (bajar para versión en español)

I've been too busy to write lately because I've been doing research for a class where I taught the history of the collage from its beginning until today. While I was researching for that class, I realized that I've seen a lot of photo collage last months. In fact, even if I had some discussions about it with some friends who don’t agree, I truly believe that the photo cut and paste technique is at his peak right now. That's the reason why I decided to write this post.
 
I think that I have to start distinguishing between photo collage and photomontage. I can simply say that collage is made of scissors and glue, while photomontage is usually much more subtle and advanced technologically.  Collage likes to show his structure and composition through sharp edges, whereas photomontage prefers to hide them using well-done layer masks, double expositions or another analogical or digital techniques. We can see and almost touch the different layers in the collage, while they will be always merged and printed in one only piece in the photomontage.



DER
DADA. #3, April 1920. Published by
Raoul Hausmann, John Heartfield and George Grosz.


If we want to talk about the beginning of any of both disciplines, we must go back until the Dada movement. Even if it is known that before Dadaists appeared some other artists and just simple photography users cut and pasted photos with many different intentions and results, it is fair to say that those new artists that appeared first in Zurich and Berlin, showing their willingness to put everything in question, their need to a personal revolution or their attacks to the bourgeois concept of the aesthetics and the economy of the art deserve the title of the pioneers of the photo collage and photomontage.

It is funny to me to read how some of those different artists claimed that they where the true and only inventors of the new discipline, while at the same time they were attacking -using the new tool for it - the political the economical system. Raoul Hausmann, Hanna Höch and John Heartfield are some of those artists that have to be mentioned.  Hausmann is considered one of the founders of Dadaist movement in Berlin; he edited the magazine “Der Dada” and organized the First International Dada Fair at the same time that he worked in his collages, writings and institutional critics in the aftermath of the World War I.

Raoul Haussman

Raoul Haussman

  
Raoul Haussman

 
Raoul Haussman, L'acteur 1946
 
Hana Höch was the only woman of the Dada group and she suffered the chauvinism of that period. In spite of it all, she was able to keep a really interesting personality and coherence on her work. Her collages using color talking about the woman and critiquing the politics are her more known works of art.

  Hannah Höch, Cut with the Kitchen Knife Dada
through the Last Weimar Beer-Belly Cultural Epoch of Germany, 1919
 
 Hannah Höch, Da Dandy, 1919
 
  Hannah Höch, Dompteuse (Tamer), 1930

Hannah Höch, Russian Dancer/My Double, 1928

Hannah Höch, The Bride, 1933 

 
John Heartfield (born Helmut Herzfeld) also formed part of the Dada movement of Berlin. He was the greatest one using the collage as a propagandistic tool. In 1930, he started to publish his collages regularly at the AIZ magazine (Arbeiter-lllustrierte Zeitung, The Workers Pictorial Newspaper) and he gained international recognition. His biting critic language, the satire and the slogan - use photography as a weapon - that was written on top of the entrance to his room at the Film und Foto exhibition that happened in Stuttgart in 1929, are the hallmarks of this German artist.



John
Heartfield, Adolf the superman (1932)

John Heartfield, Hurray the Butter is Gone! (1935)

John Heartfield,  War and corpses - The last hope of the rich

John Heartfield (German, 1891–1968)
The Meaning of the Hitler Salute: Little man asks for big gifts.
Motto: Millions Stand Behind Me!
1932


John
Heartfield, 
He must fall, before the war fells you! 
Create the Popular Front 1936

In Russia artists as Rodchenko and El Lissitzky and their photocollages and photomontages went together with the socialist constructivism. El Lissitzky was the one who, through the Bauhaus master Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, learned the art of the cut and paste, and took it with him to his homeland.



RODCHENKO, Alexander - MAYAKOVSKII, Vladimir.
Pro Eto. Ei i Mne. [About this. To her and to me] 1923


Aleksandr Rodchenko. Illustration for the 'Young Guard' magazine, 1924.

 
Design by Sophia and Lazar El Lissitzky.
SSSR NA STROIKE ("USSR in Construction"). Illustrated Magazine. 1940

 
Design by Sophia and Lazar El Lissitzky.
SSSR NA STROIKE ("USSR in Construction"). Illustrated Magazine. 1940

 
El Lissitzky, Soviet Press Catalogue, 1928
Although Man Ray made many more photograms - or better said Rayograms following the megalomania that was in fashion at the time that bourgeois concept of art was hated - than photo collages, one of those few titled the Ingres's Violin has become in one of his most iconic art pieces. We also have to thank him some other lab techniques such as the solarization and the resulting Mackie line.

Man Ray, Ingres's Violin

Man Ray, Solarized portrait of Marie Gill, 1931


There were many artists from very different countries who practiced the photo collage at that between wars time. I would have to extend this entry too much if wanted to talk about all of them, but at least I’m going to mention a couple of Polish artists that I think that also deserve their line in the history. Mieczysław Szczuka was the leader of the Blok group, who at the same time can be considered as a part of the international constructivist movement. Mieczilaw Berman was also very influenced by what was coming from Russia at the beginning of his career, but when he discovered Heartfields work, he followed it making a strong turn to the satire and the political criticism.

Mieczysław Szczuka, "Studium plakatowe", 1925, Muzeum Sztuki, Łódź

Mieczysław Szczuka

Mieczysław Szczuka

Mieczilaw Berman 

Mieczilaw Berman 

Mieczilaw Berman   

I cannot forget the most known Spanish artist Josep Renau, who worked before, during and after the Spanish Civil War. Renau was a graphic artist of the republican communist front that made and published most of the propagandistic posters and magazines of that time. He was appointed as the director of the fine arts of Spain and he organized the Spanish pavilion of the International Exhibition of Arts and Techniques of Paris in 1937. He was the one who commissioned Picasso to paint a mural for the pavilion that Picasso accepted delivering Gernika. I have to admit that before I did this short investigation I only knew Renaus communist posters, but I while I was searching I found this collages that I think that are good enough to admire.

Josep Renau, 
Workers, contrymen, soldiers, intelectuals fill the lines of the communist party

 Josep Renau, The marines of Cronstadt, a Soviet Film

Josep Renau, President talks about peace

 Josep Renau, Oh! How beautifu the war is!


Nicolas de Lekuona is not as well-known as Renau, but I think that he also deserves his space in this paper. He did amazing drawings, photographs and collages before he died during the Spanish Civil War.

Nicolas de Lekuona, Untitled 1936
 
Nicolas de Lekuona, Untitled 1936 

Herbert Bayer is another name that has to be in this text. He was a student first and teacher later-on at the Bauhaus, graphic designer, typographer, landscape architect and one of the most known photo collage artists.

Herbert Bayer, Self portrait, 1932

Herbert Bayer, Bauhaus catalogue

Herbert Bayer, Lonesome City Dweller, 1932

Herbert Matter is going to be the last name of this list of pioneers of the photo collage. He was one of the first ones using collage in ads. After collaborating with Le Corbussier, in 1932 started working commercially for magazines such as Vogue or Harpers Bazaar and later on, as graphic designer at the Museum of Modern Art.  

Herbert Matter

Herbert Matter 

Herbert Matter 

I will jump forward on time in the second part of this post, avoiding all what happened since the 50s until now. I think that on the last 60 years the art world, the graphic design and the publicity had found their own paths, even if I also think that they will always be following and sharing directions. Pop Art is the best example of it because it was one of the artistic movements that kept on using collage and photomontage during those years.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

COLLAGE (primera parte español)

He estado muy ocupado para escribir últimamente porque estaba preparando unas clases en las quería enseñar a los alumnos como el collage ha evolucionado desde su nacimiento hasta hoy. Mientras trabajaba en esa clase me di cuenta de que he visto mucho fotomontaje y foto collage durante los últimos meses. Y creo que he visto tanto corta-pega porque, aunque haya alguno por ahí que me lo discuta, creo que es una disciplina que está de moda, o mejor dicho, en auge, ya que “de moda” tiene ciertas connotaciones negativas que entiendo que pueden sentar mal. A raíz de la pequeña investigación para las clases y esa tendencia contemporánea hacia el collage me he decidido a escribir este post.

Creo que tengo que empezar diferenciando el fotocollage del fotomontaje y puedo simplificarlo mucho diciendo que el collage necesita de tijeras y pegamento mientras que el fotomontaje suele ser más sutil y avanzado tecnológicamente. Al collage le gusta dejar ver su estructura y composición por medio de recortes afilados y no siempre cuidadosos, mientras que el fotomontaje sí que la oculta por medio de capas con máscaras bien trabajadas, de dobles exposiciones o de cualquier tipo de tecnología tanto analógica como digital que tenga a su alcance. En el collage se ven y se tocan las diferentes capas, en el fotomontaje esas capas se fusionan antes de realizar la impresión.

DER DADA. #3, Abril 1920. Editado por 
Raoul Hausmann, John Heartfield y George Grosz.

De todas formas, si queremos hablar de los inicios de cualquiera de los dos casos, obligatoriamente tenemos que remontarnos al movimiento Dadá. Aunque es sabido que antes de que los dadaístas saltarán a la palestra otros autores o meros consumidores de fotografía recortaron fotografías y las pegaron sobre otras con distintas intenciones de forma puntual y aleatoria, es de justicia histórica concederles a aquellos nuevos artistas que inicialmente surgieron en Zurich y en Berlín, mostrando su disponibilidad a poner todo en cuestión, su necesidad de llevar a cabo una revuelta personal o sus ataques al concepto burgués de la estética y economía del arte, el título de iniciadores del fotomontaje y el foto collage.

Para mi tiene un punto contradictorio e irónico leer a los diferentes autores del movimiento reclamando (diría que casi patentando) para sí el descubrimiento del fotomontaje al mismo tiempo que atacaban la jerarquía política y económica empleando para ello justamente el nuevo invento. Entre aquellos Dadaistas que inventaron el fotocollage y el foto montaje hay que nombrar a Raoul Hausmann, a Hanna Höch y a John Heartfield. Hausman, considerado uno de los fundadores del movimiento Dadá en Berlín, editó la revista “Der Dada” y organizó junto a otros, la Primera Feria Internacional Dadá al mismo tiempo que desarrolló su trayectoria artística por medio de collages, escritos y críticas institucionales nada más acabar la primera guerra mundial.




Raoul Haussman

Raoul Haussman

  
Raoul Haussman

Raoul Haussman, L'acteur 1946



Hanna Höch, única mujer del grupo berlinés en el que a todas luces sufrió del machismo imperante en la época, mantuvo una interesantísima personalidad y coherencia en su trabajo. Sobresalen los collages donde trata temas relacionados con la mujer o la ironía política y su utilización del color.



  Hannah HöchCut with the Kitchen Knife Dada  through the 
Last Weimar Beer-Belly Cultural Epoch of Germany, 1919

 Hannah HöchDa Dandy, 1919

  Hannah HöchDompteuse (Tamer), 1930

Hannah Höch, Russian Dancer/My Double, 1928

Hannah HöchThe Bride, 1933 



John Heartfield (nacido Helmut Herzfeld) también formó parte del movimiento Dada berlinés, en el que destacó por el uso propagandístico que hizo del collage. Con las imágenes que empezó a publicar en 1930 en la revista AIZ (Arbeiter-lllustrierte Zeitung, o Periódico Ilustrado Obrero) consiguió un reconocimiento internacional que aún hoy perdura. La crítica sarcástica, la sátira y el slogan “utilizad la fotografía como arma” que colocó sobre la entrada a su sala en la exposición Film und Foto celebrada en Stuttgart en 1921 son las señas de identidad de este autor alemán. 




John 
Heartfield, Adolf the superman (1932)

John Heartfield, Hurray the Butter is Gone! (1935)

John Heartfield,  War and corpses - The last hope of the rich

John Heartfield (German, 1891–1968)
The Meaning of the Hitler Salute: Little man asks for big gifts.
Motto: Millions Stand Behind Me! 
1932


John 
Heartfield
He must fall, before the war fells you! 
Create the Popular Front 1936



En Rusia el fotomontaje va de la mano con la política comunista y el constructivismo por medio de Rodchenko y El Lissitzky. que justamente fue quién de mano de la Bauhaus de Moholy-Nagy, profesor clave de la mítica escuela germana, descubrió la nueva técnica del corta y pega y la llevó consigo a su tierra.



RODCHENKO, Alexander - MAYAKOVSKII, Vladimir.
Pro Eto. Ei i Mne. [About this. To her and to me] 1923


Aleksandr Rodchenko. Illustration for the 'Young Guard' magazine, 1924.

 
Design by Sophia and Lazar El Lissitzky.
SSSR NA STROIKE ("USSR in Construction"). Illustrated Magazine. 1940

 
Design by Sophia and Lazar El Lissitzky.
SSSR NA STROIKE ("USSR in Construction"). Illustrated Magazine. 1940

 
El Lissitzky, Soviet Press Catalogue, 1928


Aunque Man Ray realizó más fotogramas, o mejor dicho, Rayogramas (siendo fieles a la megalomanía tan de moda entre aquellos que detestaban el arte burgués...) que fotocollages, uno de estos últimos titulado el Violín de Ingres se ha convertido en una de sus imágenes más icónicas. A él hay que agradecerle también otro tipo de piruetas de laboratorio como la solarización y la consecuente línea de Mackie.



Man Ray, Ingres's Violin

Man Ray, Solarized portrait of Marie Gill, 1931



Fueron muchos los artistas y de muy diferentes países los que realizaron fotocollages en aquella época de entre guerras. Me tendría que extender demasiado para nombrarlos a todos, pero por lo menos voy a citar a un par de creadores polacos que creo que merecen su lugar en la historia. Mieczysław Szczuka fue el referente del grupo Blok, a los que se les puede considerar como parte del Movimiento Constructivista Internacional. Mieczilaw Berman en sus inicios también estuvo muy influenciado por lo que llegaba de Rusia pero cuando descubrió el trabajo de Heartfield, dio un giro radical hacia la sátira y la crítica mordaz.


Mieczysław Szczuka, "Studium plakatowe", 1925, Muzeum SztukiŁódź

Mieczysław Szczuka

Mieczysław Szczuka

Mieczilaw Berman 

Mieczilaw Berman 

Mieczilaw Berman   


Si hablo de fotomontaje no puedo dejar de nombrar Josep Renau, el más conocido de los fotomontajistas españoles antes, durante y después de la guerra civil española. Renau ejerció de grafista de la propaganda republicana comunista, de director de bellas artes y, como tal, fue el encargado de organizar el pabellón español de la Exposición Internacional de Artes y Técnicas del 37 en París, para la que tuvo la gran idea de encargar una pintura a Picasso, que respondió creando el Gernika. He de reconocer que hasta que empecé esta pequeña investigación, de Josep Renau solo conocía los fotomontajes en forma de cartel propagandístico comunista. Indagando sobre su vida y obra he encontrado algunos fotocollages que creo que también merecen la pena ser mostrados.


Josep Renau, poster propagandístico del partido comunista

Josep Renau, poster de una película soviética

Josep Renau, Oh que bella es la guerra

Josep Renau, El presidente habla de paz



También quiero aprovechar para hacerle un pequeño homenaje al artista vasco poco conocido Nicolás de Lekuona, que antes de que cayera muerto en la guerra realizó preciosas pinturas, fotografías y fotocollages.

Nicolas de Lekuona, Untitled 1936 

 
Nicolas de Lekuona, Untitled 1936 



Para acabar con los inicios del corta y pega, hay mencionar al mítico Herbert Bayer. Alumno y después profesor de la Bauhaus, diseñador, tipógrafo, paisajista y autor de alguno de los fotocollages más conocidos.


Herbert Bayer, Autorretrato

Herbert Bayer, Ciudad solitaria, 1932


Herbert Bayer, catálogo de Bauhaus


Y también al suizo Herbert Matter, que fue el primero en girar de una forma clara el fotomontaje hacia la publicidad, ya que después de colaborar con Le Corbussier, desde 1932 empezó a trabajar de manera comercial para revistas como Vogue o Harpers Bazaar y más tarde como diseñador del Museo de Arte Moderno.


Herbert Matter 

Herbert Matter 

Herbert Matter  


En este punto, y obviando conscientemente todo lo ocurrido entre los años 50 y hoy, voy a dar un gran salto hasta la escena contemporánea. Solo decir que a lo largo de todos estos años el mundo del arte, del diseño gráfico o de la publicidad se han posicionado de forma clara e identificable, aunque siempre se necesitarán unos de otros siguiendo caminos paralelos, cuando no divergentes. El arte Pop es el claro ejemplo de ello, ya que es uno de los movimientos que seguirá utilizando el fotomontaje y el fotocollage durante esa época.

No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario